LOGO DESIGN – NIKE, ADIDAS, LACOSTE

A DOSE OF INSPIRATION

It is that is what each one of us constantly seeks in our lives…… Inspiration is a critical element of producing creative work.  Well I am here to cite a few inspirational stories behind  iconic LOGOS . I am sure these would help you with that spark for that design

1. NIKE: SWOOSH

In 1971 company founder Phil Knight was supplementing his modest income from his fledgling Blue Ribbon Sports, Inc., by teaching an accounting class at Portland State University. Carolyn Davidson, a graphic design student there who was working on a drawing assignment in the hallway was offered a modest fee to design work for his small company. According to Davidson, Knight wanted a design that suggested movement. She let flow the creative juices and came back to him with numerous designs. None captivated his imagination, but with time running low he grabbed the Swoosh,

It should be noted that Davidson earned $35 USD for her original designs – but received considerate stock options in the company once the brand was more established.

2. ADIDAS : LOGO

The original three-stripes mark was created by founder Adi Dassler and first used on footwear in 1949 and born out of Dassler’s attempt to paint his endeavor as “the three stripe company.” Over the years it has seen two additional shifts. In August 1971 the adidas Trefoil was born out of the company’s expanded reach into the apparel and leisure field whose geometric execution with a triple intersection symbolized the diversity of the adidas brand. In 1997, then Creative Director Peter Moore (who created the Jumpman) introduced a three-bar shape shape that also represents a mountain – indicating the challenge to be faced and the goals to be achieved.

3.  LACOSTE: CROCODILE

Frenchman René Lacoste was a superstar tennis player – earning himself the number one ranking in the world in 1926 and 1927 – and a nickname from the American press, “The Alligator” after placing a wager with the French Davis Cup captain for an alligator skin suitcase. When he returned to France, alligator became crocodile, and Lacoste was known forever after as “the Crocodile.” When a friend drew a crocodile for him, Lacoste had it embroidered on the blazer he wore on the court. As Smithsonian Magazine put it, “He found the attire associated with the sport restrictive. Tennis whites, as they were called, consisted of a white, long-sleeved button-down shirt, long pants and a tie. It was a lot of clothing to wear when racing to the net to make an overhead shot.” Thus, we now have the crocodile polo shirt.

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